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Domestic Violence in Contemporary Iranian Cinema

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Domestic Violence in Contemporary Iranian Cinema

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Cinema Iranica (May 27, 2024) Domestic Violence in Contemporary Iranian Cinema. Retrieved from https://cinema.iranicaonline.org/article/domestic-violence-in-contemporary-iranian-cinema/.
"Domestic Violence in Contemporary Iranian Cinema." Cinema Iranica - May 27, 2024, https://cinema.iranicaonline.org/article/domestic-violence-in-contemporary-iranian-cinema/
Cinema Iranica April 12, 2024 Domestic Violence in Contemporary Iranian Cinema., viewed May 27, 2024,<https://cinema.iranicaonline.org/article/domestic-violence-in-contemporary-iranian-cinema/>
"Domestic Violence in Contemporary Iranian Cinema." Cinema Iranica - Accessed May 27, 2024. https://cinema.iranicaonline.org/article/domestic-violence-in-contemporary-iranian-cinema/

This study of domestic violence in contemporary Iranian cinema, especially movies made after 2009 Presidential Election, uncovers how cinema reflects the growing consciousness of the society regarding various aspects of patriarchal oppression. Domestic violence in these movies is predominantly the violence of men against women, and in fewer instances, violence against children. While earlier cinematic representations of domestic abuse focused on severely battered wives and on financially disadvantaged classes, it is now dealing with subtle aspects of violence including sexual, emotional and psychological abuse, and shows the struggles of a wider diversity of cultural and economic backgrounds. Similarly, a change is appearing in demonstrating how domestic violence affects both the victim and the victimizer. In the earlier examples, the violence was blamed on an individual’s psychological disorders, but currently more movies are spelling out the connection between domestic violence and the discursively systematic violence against women. It is only recently that we see the victimizer having to live with the consequence of their act of domestic violence and suffering from it. They expose how patriarchy oppresses men, too, by imposing hegemonic definitions of masculinity on them. Most importantly, a few, though not enough, recent movies hint at a possibility of change, healing and even success for victims of domestic violence. These points reveal that Iranian cinema is responding to a gradual shift in the sociopolitical discourses of gender, patriarchy, and authority the ever-growing significance of which is now evident, looking back at several uprisings of recent years in Iran.